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FILE PHOTO: Planned Parenthood South Austin Health Center is seen in Austin, Texas, U.S. on June 27, 2016.  REUTERS/Ilana Panich-Linsman/File Photo REUTERS/Ilana Panich-Linsman/File Photo By Jon Herskovitz | AUSTIN, Texas AUSTIN, Texas Texas plans to block about $3 million in Medicaid funding for Planned Parenthood operations in the state, a legal document obtained on Wednesday showed, a move the reproductive healthcare group said could affect nearly 11,000 low-income people. Planned Parenthood said it would seek court help to block the funding halt, which would cut cancer screenings, birth control, HIV testing and other programs. Planned Parenthood gets about $500 million annually in federal funds, largely in reimbursements through Medicaid, which provides health coverage to millions of low-income Americans. Texas and several other Republican-controlled states have tried to cut the organization's funding after an anti-abortion group released videos last year that it said showed officials from Planned Parenthood negotiating prices for fetal tissues from abortions it performs. Texas sent a notice to Planned Parenthood in the state on Tuesday to alert it of the funding cut, the document showed, saying the basis of the termination was the videos. Planned Parenthood has denied wrongdoing, saying the videos were heavily edited and it does not profit from fetal tissue donation. It has challenged similar defunding efforts in other states, calling them politically motivated. It added that previous funding cuts in Texas have had devastating effects on healthcare for poor residents and the state rarely fills the void for lost services. "Texas is a cautionary tale for the rest of the nation," Cecile Richards, Planned Parenthood Action Fund's president, said in a statement. "With this action, the state is doubling down on reckless policies that have been absolutely devastating for women." Republican President-elect Donald Trump has pledged to defund Planned Parenthood, and at least 14 states have tried to pass legislation or taken administration action to prevent the organization from receiving federal Title X funding. The state investigated Planned Parenthood over the videos and a grand jury in January cleared it of any wrongdoing.

Bringing together such high caliber players like Michael Jordan and Magic Johnson on one team proved wildly popular and since their unbeaten run at the Games the number of international players in the NBA has continued to rise. Michael Jordan The game of basketball ultimately became an international phenomenon when Jordan arrived on the scene and thrilled fans in arenas across the league with his incredible leaping ability and hang time, earning him the nickname "Air Jordan." With basketball at a crossroads in the United States and tepid interest aboard, Jordan helped turn that around with his signature line of shoes, apparel, unique logo and resounding success on the court that made him a huge commercial hit and one of the most recognized Americans in the world. Shot Clock Pace of play sometimes slowed to a crawl in the early years when a team holding a lead could pass the ball endlessly to kill time off the game clock. An extreme NBA example came in 1950 when the Fort Wayne Pistons beat the Minneapolis Lakers 19-18. In 1954, the Syracuse Nationals tried a 24-second timer at a scrimmage, figuring 60 shots a team made for an enjoyable game and dividing 120 into 48 minutes of play. The NBA adopted the 24-second clock from the 1954-55 season. Glory Road At the height of the civil-rights era in 1966 the Texas Western Miners became the first team with an all-black starting lineup to win a national title in U.S. men's college basketball. The Miners, who defeated an all-white Kentucky team, were inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2007 and their story inspired the book and film 'Glory Road,' which explores racism, discrimination, and student athletics. Giants of the Game Wilt Chamberlain, a nearly unstoppable force who possessed the height and reach to block shots, capture rebounds, and score nearly at will, and rival Bill Russell, a defensive wizard who led the Boston Celtics to eight consecutive NBA titles from 1959-1966, opened doors for a new, athletic era of 'big men'. Wilt "the Stilt" remains the only player to score 100 points in a single NBA game - a record most experts feel will never be broken - and his sheer dominance forced the league into several rules that would limit the effect a center can have on a game.

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Her lifelong love for running. Natalie says she has been passionate about running since the time she could lace up her own shoes. She decided to collaborate with Reebok in the hope that she would share her own love of running and fitness with kids across the country. TODAY Proceeds from the shoes will go to " BOKS," "Build Our Kids Success" a free program that provides children across the country with fun physical activities before the school day. Reebok will donate $10,000 to the BOKS program. In addition, Reebok will donate $10 for every pair of shoes purchased. Reebok Natalie teamed up with Reebok for her TODAY's Original product: running shoes for kids. Natalie chose to partner with Reebok because of the importance running plays in her own life: "Running is my meditation, my therapy, my time to rock out and even my time to pray. With the rhythm of my stride... I often think my best thoughts, clear my head and find my inner cheerleader who is always pushing me to my limits. This is why I run." More NBC's Season of Kindness videos RELATED: Matt Lauer's notebooks for charity with Shinola are back in stock!

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